How Much a Pint of Beer Will Cost You Around the World

Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images
Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images

After updating your passport and packing your suitcase, there's one last thing you should check before going on vacation: How much will a pint of beer cost at your destination?

Just as food and lodging varies in price from country to country, so does beer. To make sure you're prepared for whatever you find on beer menus abroad, The Wall Street Journal has compiled the average cost of a pint of beer in major cities around the world, using data from the travel site OMIO's Beer Price Index.

According to this data, Hong Kong is home to the most expensive brews, with bar patrons shelling out an average of $10.86 per pint in the city. Beer prices don't look much better in the U.S., where the average pint of beer at a bar costs $8.97 in both Miami and New York.

To find cheap beer, you need to head to Eastern Europe or South Asia. A pint costs an average of just $2.22 at bars in Bratislava, Slovakia, the cheapest of any of the cities the WSJ looked at. In Delhi, India, you can get a pint for $2.31, and in Kiev, Ukraine, you can find one for $2.36.

If you're factoring beer prices into your future vacation plans, check out the five most expensive pints and five least expensive pints by city below. And for a different way to look at international beer prices, here's how much beer you can get for $1 around the world.

Cities With the Most Expensive Pints of Beer

1. Hong Kong: $10.86
2. Geneva, Switzerland: $10.77
3. Tel Aviv, Israel: $9.53
4. New York City: $8.97
5. Miami: $8.97

Cities With the Cheapest Pints of Beer

1. Bratislava, Slovakia: $2.22
2. Delhi, India: $2.31
3. Kiev, Ukraine: $2.36
4. Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam: $2.58
5. Kraków, Poland: $2.70

[h/t The Wall Street Journal]

Why Choosing the Second Cheapest Wine on the Menu Isn't Such a Good Idea

iStock.com/kupicoo
iStock.com/kupicoo

For those whose knowledge of wine is limited to whatever lessons they picked up while watching Sideways, it can be tempting to order a glass of the second-cheapest vino on the menu at bars and restaurants. According to this line of reasoning, you don't want to look cheap by choosing the least expensive wine—but at the same time, it doesn't make sense to order a pricey vintage red if you're not the kind of wine enthusiast who confidently throws around terms like "mouth-feel" and "hints of oak" and would therefore understand and appreciate the difference in quality.

Although this wine hack is widely observed, the Skimm points out why it isn't such a sound method. For one, restaurants are well aware of this customer habit and might even use it to their advantage by taking a bottle they're looking to get rid of and placing it in the second-cheapest slot. That could mean that you're getting a not-so-great bottle of wine and may have been better off ordering the cheapest one on the list.

"I can confirm that restaurants will occasionally reprice a wine that they need to move to make it the second-cheapest spot on the menu," sommelier Kirsten Vicenza tells Atlas Obscura. "It sells!"

And then there are the markups. According to Wine Enthusiast, the cheapest wines tend to have the highest markups, so while your bill may be lower than if you had ordered a top-tier wine, you're also getting the lowest value. The magazine recommends ordering a wine somewhere in the middle—perhaps the third or fourth cheapest wine—to get more bang for your buck.

This isn't a "hard and fast rule," though, as VinePair notes. Sommeliers will sometimes lower the price of a lesser-known wine to encourage customers to try it. If you're unsure what to order, it never hurts to ask for a recommendation.

[h/t Skimm]

10 Surprising Facts About America's Drunken Shopping Habit

iStock.com/MartinPrescott
iStock.com/MartinPrescott

If you’ve ever gulped down a few glasses of wine before logging onto Amazon, you might know that loosened inhibitions and the ease of one-click shopping can sometimes lead to some odd items turning up at your door. However bizarre the purchase, or steep the monetary damage, buzzed shopping happens. According to the results of the 2019 Drunk Shopping Census (yes, it’s a real thing), Americans spend an estimated $45 billion per year while under the influence of alcohol. These findings come from The Hustle, which surveyed more than 2000 adult Americans who drink alcohol.

The average survey respondent was 36 years old and earned $92,000 a year. Because of these skewed demographics, “The data presented here is by no means definitive or conclusive,” The Hustle notes. “Nonetheless, it still provides an interesting snapshot of the drunk shopping market.”

Here are a few of their findings:

  1. Kentuckians spend the most while drunk shopping, dropping an estimated $742 per year.
  1. The majority of respondents (79 percent) had made an alcohol-fueled purchase at some point in their lives.
  1. Amazon is by far the preferred retail outlet among drunk shoppers.
  1. The most common drunk purchases are clothing and shoes, followed by movies, games, tech, and food.
  1. Seven percent of survey respondents have gotten buzzed and bought software.
  1. Women are slightly more likely to drink and shop than men, but not by much (80 percent of women compared to 78 percent of men).
  1. Millennials are the generation most guilty of shopping while tipsy, followed by Generation X, then Baby Boomers.
  1. Of survey respondents who listed their profession, writers are among the people who are least likely to "drink and Prime."
  1. People who work in sports are the most likely to splurge while intoxicated.
  1. Some of the weirder purchases listed by respondents include: A full-sized inflatable bouncy castle, 200 pounds of fresh bamboo, the same vest that Michael J. Fox wore in Back to the Future, and a splinter that had been removed from former NBA player Olden Polynice's foot.

For more insight into the strange spending habits of inebriated Americans, check out The Hustle’s website.

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