25 Irish Slang Terms You Should Know

iStock.com/levers2007
iStock.com/levers2007

People in Ireland speak English, but not exactly the "Queen’s English." With a little help from the Gaelic language—called Irish—the populace of the Emerald Isle have devised their very own myriad of weird and wonderful words and phrases. Here are a few Irish colloquialisms to help you understand the next person from Derry, Dublin, or Donegal that you come in contact with:

  1. Craic (pronounced "crack"): This is the big one. Originally crack as used by Ulster Scots, the Gaelic spelling of the word was not widely used in Ireland until it was popularized as the catchphrase of the Irish-language TV show SBB ina Shuí starting in the 1970s. Now, craic is probably the word most commonly used by Irish people across the world. The word has a pretty simple meaning, however—"general banter" or "fun."
  1. Wee: Small. Everything in Ireland is wee. Absolutely everything. If Big Shaq was Irish, he’d have been called "Wee Shaq."
  1. Wean (pronounced "wayne"): A child.
  1. Lethal/leefs: Mainly used in the northwest of Ireland, these words both mean "great"; leefs is short for "lethal."
  1. Quare (pronounced "kware"): An odd-looking word that also means "great," or "very."
  1. Feck off: Quite possibly Ireland’s greatest achievement, this phrase is the perfect way to curse without technically cursing. Replace the e with a u, and you have what this slang term means.
  1. Dooter: A wee (see above) walk.
  1. Saunter: A slightly brisker walk. Almost a strut, but with less shoulder movement and self-confidence.
  1. Aye/Naw: Yes/no.
  1. Yes: Hello (this one doesn’t make sense—we know that).
  1. Lashing: Raining heavily.
  1. Slag: Used as a verb, it means to make a joke at someone else’s expense.
  1. Wired to the moon: You know that feeling you get when you’ve enjoyed a fairly big Tuesday night in a club, and then stumble into work the next morning after downing six espresso shots at the nearest Starbucks? Yes, that is what being "wired to the moon" is.
  1. Jesus, Mary & Joseph: When it comes to blasphemy, there are no half measures in Ireland. As a historically religious country, blasphemy is relatively frowned upon, so when an Irish person it absolutely necessary to take the Lord’s name in vain, they do so by taking Jesus’s whole family in vain.
  1. Cat: Bad … because apparently Irish people think cats are bad?
  1. Brock: Also bad.
  1. Eejit: A person who is a bit of an idiot.
  1. While man/woman: A person who is also a bit of an idiot.
  1. Melter: And yet another person who is a bit of an idiot, or at least very annoying.
  1. Haven’t a baldies: When you are unsure of an answer to a question.
  1. Wind your neck in: The perfect way to take someone who is overly arrogant down a peg or two? Tell them to "wind their neck in."
  1. Yonks: A long time.
  1. Bake: Face.
  1. Juke: A wee (see way above) look.
  1. All lured: Delighted.

Find Your Birthday Word With the Oxford English Dictionary's Birthday Word Generator

iStock/photoman
iStock/photoman

Language is always changing and new words are always being formed. That means there are a bunch of words that were born the same year you were. The Oxford English Dictionary has created the OED birthday word generator, where you can find a word that began around the same time you did.

Click on your birth year to see a word that was first documented that year, and then click through to see what that first citation was. Then explore a little and be surprised by words that are older than you expect (frenemy, 1953), and watch cultural changes emerge as words are born (radio star, 1924; megastar, 1969; air guitar, 1983).

Does your birthday word capture your era? Does it fit your personality? Perhaps birthday words could become the basis for a new kind of horoscope.

This story has been updated for 2019.

What Are The Most Popular Baby Names In Your State? An Interactive Tool Will Tell You

iStock/PeopleImages
iStock/PeopleImages

Baby names can be just as in vogue, as unpopular, and occasionally as controversial as any fashion trend. If you were ever curious to see which names were the most popular in your home state, now you can.

The Social Security Administration has an interactive tool on its website that allows users to see the top 100 names that made it onto birth certificates by both birth year and state. There’s also an option for seeing what the top five names were by year, plus links to the most popular baby names by territory and decade as well as background info that explains the data itself.

Maine, for example, saw a high number of Olivers and Charlottes born in 2018 while Brysons and Viviennes rolled in last. If one were to turn the Census clock back to 1960 (the earliest year the tool can take you to), they would find that Pine Tree State folks were most partial to the names David and Susan. The names at the bottom for that year? Darryl and Lynne.

Baby names can offer telling insight into an era—they often reflect significant cultural happenings of the time. In 2009, for example, it was reported that there was a significant increase in Twilight-related names like Bella, Cullen, Jasper, Alice, and Emmett, whereas 2019 saw a spike in children’s names more appropriately found in Westeros, with Arya and Khaleesi topping the list (though one mom came to regret naming her daughter the latter).

Each of the names on the website were taken from Social Security applications. There are certain credentials by which names are listed, including the name being at least two characters long. Although it is not provided by the tool, records kept by the administration list the most popular names as far back as the 1880s.

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